Film

Oakley – Automation Engage!

Greetings fellow creatives out there! For this first-time post in a long time I’d like to share a Batch Script I finished writing last night and maybe get some feedback on the design and perhaps even help out some of you who are short on time like me and need a fast intuitive way to create all those media folders to contain your works of genius. This Batch Script in particular is for Adobe Premiere Pro users who would like to automate the folder hierarchy for the vast mediums used to create video projects.

So let’s dive in . . .

Note: The following tutorial is for Windows Users (I plan to create a similar script for Mac users in a future post) . . .

Now, first we’re going to create a .bat file using Notepad. If you have another text editor you’d like to use that’s fine, but when we’re finished editing the script, the last step is very important so pay attention.

To keep it simple, let’s open the Start Menu> Search for Run> Open Run> Type Notepad >Click ‘Ok’ or press Enter.

Once Notepad is open, copy and paste the following script:

cls
::
::

::

@Echo Off
:: Hide Following Commands

color a
:: Changes Text to Green

Echo.
Echo This batch script will create Adobe Project Folders in your C:\ Directory.
Echo.

:try
SET /P ANSWER=Do you wish to continue, Y/N?
Echo.

if /I {%ANSWER%}=={Y} (goto :START)
if /I {%ANSWER%}=={N} (goto :END)
goto :catch

::if/then statement to confirm .bat file start by user

:catch
Echo Cheif Engineer, Scotty says try typing Y or N . . .
Echo.
Timeout 3 >nul
goto :try

::Try/Catch Block for user input error

:START
echo Command Accepted, engaging…
Timeout 1 >nul
echo.
Echo Batch Creating Adobe Project Folders with Subfolders…
Timeout 1 >nul

cls
@Echo On
::Reveal commandline functions.

MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Pre_Production
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src\Adobe_AE_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src\Adobe_Encore_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src\Adobe_Photoshop_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Video
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Images
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Graphcis
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Graphcis\Lower_Thirds
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Graphcis\Titles
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Music
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\SFX
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\VFX
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\VFX\AE_Compositions
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Export
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Export\Hi_Rez
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Export\Lo_Rez

@Echo Off
::End of Batch Create, hide remaining commandline functions.
Timeout /t 2 /nobreak >nul

cls

Echo.
Echo Folders Created: Adobe Project Src and Media Folders with Subfolders
Echo.

Echo Video, Images, Graphics, Music, SFX, and VFX
Echo.

Echo Press any key to go to directory where folders were created.
Echo.

:: Message to indicate batch create was succesfful!
Echo.

Pause > nul

%SystemRoot%\explorer.exe C:\

:: Open’s C:\ Directory to where folders where created.

Echo.
Echo Thank you and have a nice day!

Timeout 3 >nul
Exit

:END

Echo Batch script terminated…
Timeout 5
exit/ b 1
::Wait 5 seconds and exit

::

Now the important part of the code if you want to customize the exact folders being created is this block here:

MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Pre_Production
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src\Adobe_AE_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src\Adobe_Encore_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Adobe_Project_src\Adobe_Photoshop_src
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Video
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Images
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Graphcis
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Graphcis\Lower_Thirds
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Graphcis\Titles
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\Music
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\SFX
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\VFX
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Media\VFX\AE_Compositions
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Export
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Export\Hi Rez
MKDIR C:\New_Adobe_Project\Export\Lo Rez

You can change these names to anything you like, but it’s important to realize that if you add any space to your folder name, it will tell Windows to create a separate folder hence is why I use underscores. Also, if you’re wanting to add a folder hierarchy, use the ‘MKDIR’ command followed by the desired directory path name.

Example: MKDIR C:\Project_Name\Subfolder_Name\etc . . .

Now the last part . . .

Save your notepad project  via File> Save As> “Project Name.bat” >Save as Type>All Files “*.*”

The last two steps are the most important. Make sure to save the file as anything you desire but end it with .bat. What is more, you must select All Files in the Save As Type dialog. This will keep it from saving as “Project name.bat.txt” which will not work.

And there you have it! I hope it helps and that you leave a comment!

Serving with nobility,

-Rob Oakley, Creative Collaborator

 

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Oakley – About Stephen Ministry

Stephen Ministries About from Rob Oakley on Vimeo.


Oakley – Summit Semester Promo 2012


Oakley – The Pikes Peak Summit Experience


Oakley – “Love” the Musical and 500px

 

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted. I actually thought my Summer would be more full of activity but lately it’s been mostly a time of waiting, patience, and spending most of my time with my family. In less than 24 hours I will be making my departure for Colorado Springs and hope to document my adventure every step of the way as I make pursuit in my much anticipated internship at Summit Ministries.

I know it’s been awhile since I’ve posted any pictures too. The reality of that is I actually have been posting a lot of photographs. . . I just managed to overlook posting my best and favorite experiences on the website. To some avail, I hope that my beloved followers can still watch for my work on my Flickr profile and now you can start following a new experience of mine  called 500px. Of course, I still intend to post much of my best work on the website, but I will also be posting a lot of my recent and best work on a very ingenious web-based portfolio by which you can start viewing at the following link.

http://roboakley.500px.com/#/0

http://500px.com/roboakley

In the mean time, I’ve also been working on my first Theatrical gig with Applause Theatre Company and hope to be posting some screen shots of my editing work along with a preview of the production itself. Plenty more details to come!

Noblesse oblige,

~Rob


Oakley – The Milagro Beanfield War

Analysis of Cultural Diversity in Robert Redford’s

The Milagro Beanfield War

In Robert Redford’s The Milagro Beanfield War, entrepreneur Ladd Devine uses wealth and elected officials to manipulate a Hispanic working-class community in building a recreation center. Areas of race, class, gender, and ability are all portrayed throughout the film—the most prominent area being the issues of the upper and lower classes. Does Redford’s depiction of war between classes reach a dominant reception or will situations and characters only appear as stereotypical and nonnegotiable interpretations? Taking a closer look and analyzing the literary and visual designs (among other technical aspects) may reveal the miracle beanfield a true sensation inspired by the heroism of a united people and a little bit of magic.
Immediately the name of Robert Redford may yield great attention. The acclaimed actor made his big break as “The Sundance Kid” and would go on to becoming a director earning an Academy Award in 1981. Eight years later he adapted John Nichols’ Novel of the Southwest into The Milagro Beanfield War;a film that tells of one man’s rugged individualism as he struggles to defend his small beanfield and his community against big business and political interests.
The cultural diversity observed kicks off with the predominantly Hispanic and Catholic fictional town of Milagro (miracle in Spanish). Heredwell the lives of Amarante Cordova, a stubborn old man who talks to an angel and dead saints; Joe Mondragon,a farmer out of work; Charlie Bloom, an unsuccessful lawyer who runs a bimonthly newspaper, and Ruby Archuleta the female mechanic—all of them, in one way or another, have something to do with a beanfield that is making a whole lot more trouble than it is actually worth.
The issue at hand, as one might think, doesn’t really have anything to do with the fact that most of the characters in the film are Hispanic and Catholic, but rather they are all under-waged working-class citizens who are Hispanic and Catholic. As if they are only good for is running a small town, farms, and construction, the stereotypical situation hardly gives them any credit for being capable, hardworking, and successful individuals. All the same, they still manage to band together and fight against the injustice set upon them by evil white men who are politicians and running big business—revealing that the lack of success and prosperity really come from the repression of a corrupt upper class that consists of dominate white patriarchal capitalists.
Gender roles are also explored in the film. The dominant masculinity expressed in the film is the irrational use of guns and violence while the intellectual and leading activist is the female mechanic. Rudy Archuleta is the primary voice against Ladd Devine and his plot to slowly end every man, women, and child’s way of life in Milagro while, Joe Mondragon represents a rugged, angry, struggling criminal nearly killing the people he’s fighting for.
What the people don’t realize is that along with the overpriced water for irrigation, their taxes will also be going up if the Miracle Valley recreational center is built—leaving them soon out of work and out of home with all their money going into the pocket of the state and Ladd Devine. This issue is soon realized when Joe decides to sow bean seeds with water he doesn’t own creating a spark of rebellion and independence. Before the people relied on Devine for work in construction, but when Joe cannot get a job, he takes matters into his own hands inspiring his small community and striking fear for the big profitable business.
Considering this issue from a more rational approach, Ruby wants to run an article in the newspaper to inform the people of not just Joe’s act of rebellion but also the consequences of the recreation center. She tries to leave it up to the discretion of Charlie Bloom to write the article, but Charlie plays the role of a bitter lawyer who won’t succumb to the women’s demands. In turn Ruby threatens to write her own article that Charlie later claims would get them sued for liable (perhaps stereotyping the irrational and forceful tone of women).  Later on, Ruby tries to call for a town meeting to democratically address the issue beginning it with a rhetorical speech to call into action an organization that would preserve the land. It is worthy to note that when someone nominates her to be the organization’s president, a member of the community states that she couldn’t because she’s a woman.
Finally there is an issue of segregation among Milago’s own people between generations and the abilities of the elderly. Along with that, there also appears to be an issue being tied with a member of the community with only one arm.Both are depicted as being delusional as the oldest man in town talks to the heavens and the man with one arm is still searching for the missing one despite the accident occurred long ago. In the end, they are town heroes very capable of holding their own.
Robert Redford directed a film that encompasses great cultural diversity between social classes and generational values by telling the story of a hypothetical and fictional event.Romanticizing audiences with discourses of an elderly man and an angel, Redford still manages to reveal a believable community with believable problems. The magic involved does not entirely take the film into a direction of being a fantasy, but rather the divine having an influence over the fate of the people. This is done mostly through the visual design of miraculous events being closely tied to the presence of the Angel. There is still a feeling of doubt as when seen with the older man by the objective view of another; the Angel appears to no longer be there. This is all accomplished by editing two shots together. For example, there is a scene where one shot features the Angel talking to the old man for a couple of takes and then vanishes once another character enters featuring the old man as talking to himself.
The use of location is also quite effective as the film was shot in the location indicated by John Nichols’ Novel: Milago is a town near the New Mexico Mountains. This adds to the realism of the setting by shooting on location. The time period would most likely be set during the time of the making of the film in the late 80’s. This could add an appeal to have a close relationship with the film as it takes place during a time audiences could relate. Modern viewers may not find it as appealing although the issues at hand may still be relevant.
The Milago Beanfield War empathically deals with social issues of a time through the eyes of those who experience hardship while gaining a hope in the divine and each other. The rolls of the people limit themselves only to the capacity of the mind. No matter the class, gender, or personal ability, nothing can or should stand in the way of social justice. Although violence appears inevitable, it is the inspired will of the people and their passionate heritage that wins in the end making a modern magic bean story yet another tale to learn from.

Oakley – Suffocation

The Following is a film analysis (not a review or synopsis) I performed as a part of my Intro to Film course at the University of North Texas. Throughout this analysis I have assumed the reader is familiar with the film in question and would also caution that it is not a film I would normally recommend. However, there can still be a lot to learn from a Hollywood narrative while observing the more prominent theme of “Isolation from Adulthood”. The Graduate, although a 70’s classic,  contains adult themes and content wherefore viewer discretion is advised.

A Theme of Suffocation

Mike Nichols’ The Graduate formally introduces a thematic portrayal of social isolation through the eyes of Benjamin Braddock, the college graduate who is worried about his future.Early in the film, Benjamin sits alone in his room while a congratulatory party awaits him outside. A more isolated miniature scuba diver figurine in a fish tank stands behind him, foreshadowing a sequence in the film desiring even closer attention. Isolation from adulthood appears as one of the most prominent themes throughout the film, and the analysis of this sequence will allow for a better understanding of its design. All five formal axis of Hollywood cinema shall be taken in close account beginning with the literary design.
Dressed in California Contemporary Sport style, the Braddocks are celebrating Benjamin’s twenty-first birthday. The scene opens with Benjamin’s father announcing to everyone the unveiling of the “Afternoon’s feature attraction.” Benjamin is hesitant to come out and embarrass himself as he sounds to be having second thoughts about his birthday present. Left with no choice, Benjamin comes outside wearing a diving suit and is led to his new underwater habitat. His naïve and undisclosed desires are repressed to captivating depths.
Throughout the entirety of this sequence, there is an almost nauseous and tantalizing tone overwhelming the obvious pride of Benjamin’s father and the forceful nonsense Benjamin has to put up with. He’s finally done it. He’s raised a boy into a young man of 21 with a college degree and honors almost claiming as if they were all his own achievements. And yet the reality of the situation is the timid Benjamin who looks all but dashing and confident in his birthday suit. Benjamin’s choices have been made for him all his life leading him on to becoming the morally drifting and indecisive degenerate at the bottom of the pool. Like the little scuba doll in the fish tank, Benjamin is nothing more than a piece of materialistic value to cling to.
The dialogue comprises mostly of Benjamin’s father along with the annoyed, impatient banter from the audience and the subtle protests of Benjamin waiting in the kitchen. Benjamin’s father sounds like the ring master of a circus but is soon cut off when Benjamin walks out of the kitchen and the perspective is taken all from his point of view. Behind the mask, nothing can be heard other than the loud gestures of Benjamin’s father and the breathing apparatus. Led to the pool, Benjamin takes a plunge and is forced under by his father’s mindless and vicarious self-indulgence.
The Graduate is a very appropriate title as the story is about that of a graduating college student, but the title could also be interpreted as the sign of a new era: graduating not only from college but also into the adult class. The irony of it all, however, is although Benjamin Braddock has finished his college education, he’s still left as unsure and insecure as when he was a child—he has graduated but he hasn’t really “grownup.”
The visual design takes the literary design further. With the establishing shots and use of angles, it is only clear of what mood needs to be felt during this sequence and what is to be interpreted based on the visualization of the words of a script to pictures on a screen. From the young and hip clothing a much older generation is wearing to the mature and committed clothing of the younger generations throughout the film there would seem to be a battle being waged between the materialistic and the intellectual. Among the more impressive shots would be whenthe perspective of the viewer is taken behind the mask and through the eyes of Benjamin adding not only creativity to the shot but also the symbolic meanings behind Benjamin’s mask of isolation and narrow vision. Of course, this all ties in very well with the cinematography of the sequence following a very formalistic style with the precision of American Society of Cinematographer’s Robert Surtees.
The film was shot on Panavision 35mm anamorphic film using an anamorphic lens attaining a very wide field of view and a classic Hollywood frame. What this also achieves is subjecting audiences to more than just a single subject; however, close-ups remained the most effective and used shot. The most sticking shot used in this sequence is when Benjamin walks out in his Scuba suit toward the camera looking almost directly into the lens and breaking the fourth wall. Benjamin’s body fills the frame and the shot is changed to his perspective—literally through the mask. Finally, the camera is submerged underwater (which would require special underwater housing for the entire body of the camera) and the final shot is a wide shot of Benjamin left alone under water. All these shots were carefully edited together into a story told by Sam O’Steen.
The sequence and the voice of Benjamin’s Father is actually heard “off-camera.” In other words, the editor implanted the use of a “J-cut” and does so again when the scene ends when we hear Mrs. Robinson begin a conversation with Benjamin over the phone. What this accomplishes (especially at the end of the sequence) is allowing the viewers into the head of the protagonist, almost literally allowing them to hear Benjamin’s thoughts along with seamless transitions from one sequence to the next. A “reverse” cut is also used breaking the line of action but allowing the use of the “reverse shot” when Benjamin walks toward the camera and then transitions to his point of view and through the scuba mask. The sequence finally ends with a montage of Benjamin going into the pool, being forced down under, and then left alone in a human sized fish tank with Mrs. Robinson a phone call away.
Having analyzed almost every aspect of this sequence, a discussion of the sound design could not be left out. Realizing the importance of sound only to the point of being able to hear the dialog leaves out the actual importance and use of silence among other effects. Although the dialogue serves as a driving force for this sequence, the most memorable scene is when nothing can be heard at all except Benjamin’s breathing apparatus. This silence and not being able to hear outside of the mask could indicate more toward the theme of isolation and Benjamin’s self election to drown out the noise tying close to Simon and Garfunkel’s The Sound of Silence which opens the film. This could also be interpreted as the silence that dwells in and around Benjamin’s life giving him a “no one listens and no one cares” mentality.
The Isolation Benjamin Braddock faces among his adult peers may have everything to do with the large gap between generations; he either cannot hear or will not listen and this is demonstrated well through the analyzed sequence. Although this single part certainly will not do entirely on its own to tell a story; it still plays a powerful roll in gaining a better understanding of the themes involved leading to a mosaic of motifs and overall the bigger picture. From the figurine in the fish tank to the drudge in the pool, Benjamin’s nothing more than property with no future to call his own.

Oakley – Philanthropic Enterprise

( through audio/visual mediums)

Dear friends,

I wanted to take a moment and share a little bit about some of the things I am doing towards the benefit of myself and society.

As many of you know, I am a radio, television, and film major currently studying at University. Part of my vision in study and application is to communicate inspiring and motivational ideas through film and media. Of course, I also have some interest in the entertainment business, however, it is based solely on that of integration, unity, and discovery: not this mindless amusement we find coming out of Hollywood today.

With that said, I am also looking forward to using my passionate interest, talent, and abilities to aid local and one day national entities dedicated to the those in need on both local and global scales. My service would be based on non-for-profit motives and all donation towards a given project would be solely used toward the production of a high quality film that communicates the ideas, mission, and success of a given charitable organization.

Although I am still fairly young and have a lot of learning and experience ahead of me, it is one of my greatest hopes that this vision will be seen through by not only my personal means but by people like you who long to help and do something beyond what they normally do for the benefit of others.

I have one example of a recent project that I’d like to share with you all. It is a short introduction to a DVD I along with a young photographer created for a Pregnancy Crisis Center located in West Houston.

There is also a longer behind-the-scenes video for anyone interested in more information about the project and how it was put into action.

http://vimeo.com/1526496

Finally, I would like to share that I will be in a meeting for another similar project for an organization called “The Success for Life Through Reading” program. They are dedicated to providing college aged volunteers to reach out to low-income families and preschooled children. Part of their activities is donating books and reading out loud to the kids. Later this afternoon we’ll be discussing a very important series of videos they want to produce for the program to help recruit, train new members, and inform parents of the importance of reading in early development and love for literacy. If you’d like to learn more about the program visit the following site:

http://www.ecv.unt.edu/success-life-through-reading/

I know there is a lot we can do together and am thoroughly excited to see what the future holds.

Thank you for your time and Blessings to you all.

~Rob Oakley


Oakley – Le Jeune Wedding

I’m excited to report that a plethora of exciting images and articles will be coming to my Facebook page and Website in the coming weeks! I’ll be working on writing content for the site including “How-To” articles for anyone interested in starting a new hobby or career in photography or videography and will also be touching up on some great tips in postproduction work using Photoshop, Premier Pro, and After Effects.

In the mean time, please enjoy this short intro to Terrance and Johnathan Le Jeune’s beautiful wedding!

[Vimeo 19543974]


Oakley – Validation

Please take 16 minutes to sit down and enjoy this amazing, spectacular, well thought, and well shot short film. I guarantee it’ll put a smile on your face and inspire to make someone close to you or even a complete stranger smile too. Feel free to pass this along as it has a message that I believe everyone in the world needs to hear.